Borderlands & Duke Nukem are finally coming to theaters!

For decades filmmakers have been trying to make decent films based on popular video game franchises, but there has yet to be a single movie that would qualify as legitimately good, although the Resident Evil movies continue to make money.

Most of us recognize that video game movies could be good though, right? Many games have an interesting premise, exciting characters and are overflowing with violent action—basically all the ingredients for a successful modern film.

Well, that’s what Gearbox Software seems to think, and they’ve announced that two of their biggest franchises — Borderlands and Duke Nukem — are coming that much closer to their big-screen debuts. At E3, Gearbox CEO, Randy Pitchford, had a livestreamed sit-down with video game journalist, Geoff Keighley, to discuss the forthcoming adaptations. On Borderlands, Pitchford said, “We’ve been developing scripts and the strategy that we’re on right now is, that it’s obviously in the Borderlands universe, but rather than retell the stories that were in the game, we’ create new stories so that the films will have their own film canon … We’ll use all the characters and scenarios, it’s similar to what Marvel is doing. You can read any particular film plot in a comic book, but there’s a lot of characters, themes, and in fact, some of the situations are represented.”

Then Pitchford revealed that a Duke Nukem movie was actually really happening! “We’re working on Duke Nukem! I can’t announce it, but it’s blown my mind, there’s been a lot of production companies have come at us. We’re putting together a deal right now with a major motion picture studio; I’ll tell you off the record if you want to know. It’s the exact right people that should be doing a Duke Nukem film and we’ll see what happens. It’s unbelievable, I think that’s very likely a thing.”

Regardless of what happens with these two films, it’ll be awhile before they hit theaters. Though it IS something to look forward to!!!

New details in Carrie Fisher’s death

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Carrie Fisher had cocaine and several other drugs in her system at the time of her death, according to the actress’s full autopsy report which was released today.

The Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office cites sleep apnea as one of the causes of death and also names a variety of drugs that were in her system when she suffered cardiac arrest while traveling on a plane late last year.

“Urine toxicology on admission to the hospital was positive for cocaine, methadone, ethanol and opiates,” the report reads.

It’s important to note that the report also states that although those drugs were in her system, there are “significant limitations in one’s ability to interpret the toxicology results and their contribution to cause of death” — meaning that the coroner’s office couldn’t determine whether those drugs had played a role in Fisher’s death.

The report also adds that the cocaine in her system may have been ingested a few days earlier. It’s not clear when the other drugs in her system were taken.

Now, if it’s one thing I personally know, it’s substance abuse and addiction and what drugs can do to you, and how long drugs stay in your body. Cocaine has a very short half life. Unless you’re doing cocaine all day long, everyday, then yes, it could take anywhere from 5-7 days to get out of your system… but again you would have to be doing a lot of it. If you are using it scarcely, it could take just a couple of hours to completely leave your system. So something isn’t adding up….

Fisher, a “Star Wars” icon, died from “sleep apnea and other undetermined factors” and a history of heart disease, the report states. But the manner of her death remains listed as undetermined, according to the report.

She became unresponsive after suffering a cardiac arrest on Dec. 23 while on a flight from London to Los Angeles. She died four days later, at the age of 60.

Tim Curry receives Lifetime Achievement Award

despite the health woes, the 69-year-old was in good spirits as he was honored with The Actors Fund Lifetime Achievement Award on Sunday at the Tony Awards Viewing Party in Los Angeles. Speaking to Los Angeles magazine, he said that he has been ‘doing well’ and was ‘looking forward’ to receiving the honor.

‘I’ve done a few benefits for the Actors Fund and I think it’s a marvelous organization. I hope not to have to use it,’ the acclaimed character actor quipped.  The Actors Fund provides assistance with the cost and arrangements of funerals and burials. It’s the Legend star’s sense of humor that has helped helped him to remain optimistic since his July 2012 stroke when he collapsed at his Los Angeles home.

‘It’s not tough to maintain,’ he explained. ‘It is just part of my DNA.’ The magazine noted that his ‘speech is slowed a bit.’ In December last year, he made an appearance for a Christmas Eve dinner at Ago restaurant in Los Angeles with a friend, who pushed the It actor in a wheelchair. Tim is best known for his role as the brilliantly mad transvestite scientist Dr Frank N Furter in the The Rocky Horror Show.

He first starred in the original 1973 London production, and continued to play the part on Broadway before playing the same character in the 1975 film. On the role that catapulted him to stardom, he told Los Angeles magazine that he looks at the film’s success ‘with a sort of bemused tolerance.’ He continued: ‘It’s neither a blessing nor a curse. I was lucky to get it.’ For many years he rarely discussed the movie, fearing he would be typecast.

Tim recalled opening night during his Broadway debut in The Rocky Horror Picture Show as ‘very exciting’ but found its critics to be far too harsh. ‘I had to go on the Today Show the next day and they read the reviews – which were appalling,’ he explained. ‘That brought me down. It was very cruel.’ The reviews described his performance as ‘a mixture of Joan Crawford and Burt Lancaster’ and ‘Mick Jagger, David Bowie and Marc Bolan all in one.’

Stage legend: Between 2004 and 2007 he played King Arthur in the Monty Python musical Spamalot on stage in Chicago, Broadway and the West End

However, he won over the Broadway community in 1981 when he was nominated for a Tony Award for the lead role in the play Amadeus. ‘It was a brilliant play and a terrific production. And a wonderful part,’ he said of portraying Mozart. ‘The big problem is not to make him as loony as he is, but to make him sympathetic as well.’
Between 2004 and 2007 he played King Arthur in the Monty Python musical Spamalot on stage in Chicago, Broadway and the West End.

Some of his stage credits include What About Dick? My Favorite Year and Travesties, among others. In 2011 he was scheduled to appear in Rosencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead, however he withdrew from the production at the last minute citing ill health. Meanwhile, at the viewing party, the veteran actor arrived in a black suit and was seated in a wheelchair. He joins Theodore Bikel, Alfred Molina and Joe Morton as recipients of the same lifetime achievement award.

‘It means that it just sort of solidifies the kind of work the American acting community has given me for years now,’ he said of the honor. ‘It’s very gracious of them, I think. I was thrilled when they told me and I am thrilled now.’ When asked what life would be like for him if it reflected the theater, he said: ‘Scary. Well the theater is scary. And the longer the time in between the periods in the theater, the scarier it gets. Adding: ‘Life isn’t meant to be scary. It’s to be celebratory. In which case, it would be like the theater. I think of that as a celebration of life.’

Read more on Tim Curry:
Curtain Call: Tim Curry Discusses His Broadway Career – Los Angeles Magazine